great but not greatly known

I was really pleased to see this: “Altman’s Noir Suddenly Gets Plenty of Light” It’s always nice when you really like something and think, “Why doesn’t everybody else see what I see?” and then you find out that you’re not alone. Robert Altman’s The Long Goodbye is indeed “great but not greatly known.”

I was so excited in the comic book Hawkeye when Hawkeye (Kate Bishop, the younger and more female “Hawkeye”) is in LA, trying to establish herself as a private detective, and one night in an all-night supermarket she encounters a certain unnamed, rumpled, curly-haired private eye who starts to serve as her mentor. He’s buying cat food, of course, because his cat only eats one specific brand.

I felt like grabbing strangers on the street and pointing at the panel, demanding, “Do you know who that is?”

But I didn’t.

Here’s my review of The Long Goodbye.

 
A couple of recent articles from The Guardian caught my attention.

Amazon Christmas boycott campaign gathers weight

There seem to be two movements against Amazon these days, one because they treat their workers badly and avoid paying taxes, the other because of the Hachette dispute, and their more general approach to the traditional publishing industry.

It always strikes me as odd that these two groups haven’t come together more (or, as far as I can tell, at all).

(This may be because it’s possible that the second group doesn’t actually exist. On rereading the Time piece, I did notice a complete lack of evidence, and a heavy reliance on the words “may” and “could.” I’ve seen a lot of writers complain about how Amazon handles the book business, but is that really becoming a general movement?)

 
The Black Friday shopping scrums are so shaming

Okay, I don’t see how people in England, or anywhere other than the US, can really have Black Friday. Of course they can have days when they go shopping and go crazy, but Black Friday is, pretty much by definition, the day after Thanksgiving. When everybody (other than people who work in retail, of course, and me) are already off from work.

And, unless I’m very much mistaken, they don’t celebrate Thanksgiving in the UK. Does that mean that everybody gets Black Friday off from work anyway, to go shopping? Or do they just go out and get crazy in the evening?

It seems odd to me.

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4 Responses to great but not greatly known

  1. tsbazelli says:

    We’ve started having Black Friday in Canada too, despite having to work, and that our Thanksgiving is always in October. Here and in the UK this year, it’s just a day more people are expecting major sales on everything before Christmas.

    I do know the sales started here in Canada, because a lot of people close to the border take Black Friday day off and go shopping in the States, and local stores want to keep them here (plus not from ordering online from the US). It’s all a marketing thing.

  2. Well, I can feel superior to the crazy shoppers, but I do have to remember that I don’t have kids and I don’t give presents. So, those sales are pretty easy for me to resist. As they say, walk a mile in the other guy’s shoes.

  3. Maggie says:

    Black Friday (or a similar shopping frenzy) will probably be in all countries if it’s not already. It’s too tempting for retailers to take advantage of a day when everyone and their brother will be out buying stuff they don’t even really need.

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